Systems Basics: Systemic solutions with evidence-based medicine for relief from Insomnia – the systems thinking for everyone’s body through Traditional Chinese Medicine on the systems science of Taichi Yin-Yang Five Elements 系統論基礎工作坊:循證醫學緩解失眠的探討 – 藉以理解人類身體的系統性與中醫藥學之太極陰陽五行天地人的東方系統思維

 International Society for the Systems Sciences 61th conference

Sunday Afternoon workshop: 

Insomnia has become a modern city sickness. Research has been carried out to evaluate different Traditional Chinese Medicine treatments using evidence-based medicine methodologies. The cause of insomnia may come from one or more of the five elements systems, including the Wood mental system, the Fire emotional system, the Metal behavioural system, the Water spiritual system, and the Earth physical system (with one or more of its five sub-systems).

From this analysis we will try to find the common structure and relationship that can be generalized using systems thinking which could be applied to treat different sickness and promote healthcare. Research has shown that this systems thinking is rooted in the fundamental concept in traditional Chinese culture since around 500BC. The concept is also embedded in the teaching of Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The traditional Chinese system theories under investigation include the Taichi yin-yang system theory, the Five systems theory of the human mind, and the Traditional Chinese Medicine differential diagnosis-cure process. These theories are found to be related to different modern system theories including Viable system model.

Taichi yin-yang system theory describes the relationship between any two entities (element/process) at any level of interest. It concerns the quantitative and qualitative changes between the entities. This is related to causal loop diagram (CLD) in system dynamics which uses reinforcing loop and balancing loop. The observer is not specified in the theories, but the perspectives of the observer actually determine the entities, the unit of quantitative changes, and the ratio of qualitative changes. The Five systems theory of the human mind is one of the important concepts developed in the teaching of Buddha. The Five systems are: awareness, perspective, sensation, action and physical object. These five systems can be used to describe the properties of the observer and the decision maker.

The Traditional Chinese Medicine differential diagnosis-cure process is a practical systemic process that has been used daily for more than 2000 years. It is believed that the whole macroscopic-microscopic spectrum of systems can be suitably accommodated. The system state identification involves three pairs of direction-forming spectrums. The Superficial and Internal spectrum gathers information between the boundary and the system. The Cold and Hot spectrum gathers information between the form and function, or matter and energy within the system. The Deficient and Excess spectrum gathers information between the environment and the system. Strategy can then be formulated to regulate and maintain the system.

 

Systems Basics: Systemic solutions with evidence-based medicine for better concentrations – the systems thinking for everyone’s mind through the teaching of Buddha on the systems science of Five Aggregates 系統論基礎工作坊:循證醫學提高專注力的探討 – 藉以理解人類思想的系統性與佛學五蘊的東方系統思維

 International Society for the Systems Sciences 61th conference

Sunday Morning Systems Basics workshop:

The ability to concentrate has grown in importance in the ever speeding pace of modern society. The feedback cycle of information and matter are getting faster and faster. Moreover, multi-tasking has become a fundamental prerequisite for daily work. Furthermore, quality of services and quantity of serving duration keep increasing. All these factors require our good concentration. Research has been carried out to evaluate different treatments using evidence-based medicine methodologies. One of the treatments is the observation of one’s breath, namely Anapana, and its extension to the observation of the bodily sensations called Vipassana. In this workshop we will practice the mini version of the treatment.

From the analysis of the practice, we will try to find the common structure and relationship that can be generalized using systems thinking which could help us understand how our minds work. Research has shown that this systems thinking is rooted from the teaching of Buddha.

The application of system theory requires the understanding of ourselves and of each other, the nature, and the past and future possibilities in a systemic way. That is, we need to understand both the structure and dynamics of our physical body systems, and of our mental mind observations. Research shows that the composition of our body and that of our mind may be explained by the same system theory relating to energy, matter, life and information. We employed this simple ancient system theory as taught by Buddha to investigate how our naturally systemic-structured mind arbitrarily developed all the non-systemic and problematic way of thinking. We use our body to experience the world around us but our mind is the one which is observing and making decisions to change the world. System theory sees the world as composing of observers, decision makers, systems, the environment, the boundaries and relationships between them. There are in effect two opposite forces in the world that constantly interact with each other, creating a flow of energy, matter and information between systems and the environment. On one hand we have the disorder force governed by the second law of thermodynamics that drives everything into an equilibrium state with maximum entropy. On the other hand we have the organizational force governed by the constraints of a system that drives the system into a particular desired steady state with a low entropy.

Our minds are both the observer and the decision maker confronting a major problem. Throughout our life we look for satisfaction that brings happiness. Our government has been relying on economics to achieve this but 80% of the time we are dissatisfied with the people and situations around us, giving rise to craving, aversion and ignorance in our minds and creating all sorts of problems in our society. This is called suffering in the teaching of Buddha, and he offered us a three step solution for our mind. In this workshop we will investigate the systemic view of these three steps, namely self-protection, concentration and purification of mind. We will also investigate a 10-day Vipassana mental healthcare program for people of all religions including scientific communities. It is believed that such a program could bring happiness, peace and harmony for our society.

Is death the end of our lives or just the beginning of another new life? A system undergoes a transition of system state upon death, but will the system continue in other forms at other places? Or will it just terminate totally? What are the possible new system states and are they sustainable? In this workshop we will investigate the sustainability of Heaven, Hell, Earth and Nibbana (null). We will also investigate the way to prepare ourselves to transit into these states.

 

Happy Birthday to my dear teacher Buddha

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My Gratitude to Buddha… Thank you for teaching me how to look after the physical body. Thank you for teaching me how to manage the emotional mind. Thank you for teaching me the correct mental perception of kindness. Thank you for showing me how to live a life that is full of charitable behavior. Thank you for revealing the wisdom of Impermanence, Dissatisfaction, and Egolessness.

發自 from 黃炎 E C

System wholeness and Unity in Diversity within ISSS 2016 系統的完整性與系統界之求同存異、博大精深、見微知著、對立統一。

中醫藥工程學 Traditional Chinese Medicine Engineering

Chicken or egg first 先有雞還是先有雞蛋?

-國際系統科學協會第60屆週年國際研討會 The 60th Annual World Conference of the International Society for the Systems Sciences www.isss.org/

-健康與系統思維特別融合小組 Health and System thinking Special Integration Group

Workshop : 2016.07.24 University of Colorado, USA.

-系統論基礎工作坊:佛學的東方系統思維 - 以天人合一理解系統完整性 Systems Basics in Understanding System Wholeness “Reuniting Nature and Humanity”: The Oriental Systems Thinking in the teaching of Buddha.

Presentation: System wholeness and Unity in Diversity within ISSS 系統的完整性與系統界之求同存異、博大精深、見微知著、對立統一。

Abstract: A better way to explain the wholeness from an oriental point of view is the major direction of our research, but in the end it seems to coincide with modern Western systems thinking such as Relational-theory and DSRP systems thinking, as well as physics and mathematics. The first step starts from the concentration on the parts as in Reductionistic thinking, to the concentration on wholeness as in Systems thinking. Both schools of thought are important in their corresponding applications. The second step involves the combination of the observer and decision maker into the system, similar to the five aggregates human mind system in the teaching of Buddha, and the Relational-Theory by John Kineman. But finally the structure of the environment also need to be included for the sack of wholeness, similar to Schema theory by Kent Palmer. Now all three are coming together and forming the much better wholeness. However, this is only the structure and properties of the wholeness, and there is also the diagnostic and regulative part from Traditional Chinese Medicine, which could be the application part of systems theory in real life problem solving. Together they are very promising in forming the wholeness of systems theory and systems practice.

The structures and functions of human body in Traditional Chinese Medicine is based on the oriental system thinking of Taichi Yin-Yang structures and functions. Researches show that similar structures and functions are found in modern Western systems theories which are composed of systems, observers and decision makers, and the environment. TCM employs different systemic models to diagnose the human body. However, all these models employ the common 3D structure of Superficial-Internal, Cold-Hot, and Deficient-Excess spectrums. This oriental systems thinking seems promising in combining with modern Western systems theory in the application of system diagnosis and re-balancing. It is hoped that the combination of the east-west systems thinking will finally help human understanding in solving the modern complex problems.

Chinese writing, English writing, Middle East writing emerging from different directions will in the end all occupy the whole paper to express the intended ideas, emotion, systems, instructions, and knowledge. Different systemic models arise together with their corresponding observers and decision makers. That is, people located with different geometrical properties, from Southern or Northern part of china. In addition, people with different properties because of the different state of their civilization, either at war or peace, lack of or over-supply of food, too much leisure or too much hard work. That is to say, the systemic model is also related to the environment, combined and emerged into the perspectives part, the water sub-system, of the whole system.

References:

-Traditional Chinese Medicine Engineering by Tomas www.YinYangBalance.Asia

-中醫藥工程學 - 黃炎 – www.陰陽平衡.com

-Schemas Theory Research Initiative by Kent Palmer http://schematheory.net/

-Relational Theory by John Kineman relational-science.org

-DSRP systems thinking by Derek Cabrera stdaily.ghost.io/tag/dsrpfaq/

-Platonic Solids in All Dimensions: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/platonic.html

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjEiHcFNFIM